Month: February 2011

5 Ways to Own Vision

  5 Ways to Own Vision Organizations that behave strategically own vision. A good vision becomes operational. If the vision sits out at the 10-year horizon and never finds its way into operational influence, it is nothing but a meaningless historical artifact. Here are 5 ways to own vision: Start using the vision as a.

Read more

Early Results of #highered Survey on Social Media #edu #smcedu

Hear is an early result from my social media in higher education survey. It shows that face-2-face meeting continue as the preferred way to interact with instructors, followed by e-mail, then Facebook. If you haven’t taken they survey yet, please visit: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/higheredsocialmedia or http://tinyurl.com/45p44mo Please tell your friends, your instructors and your fellow students via.

Read more

HP Breaking the Redmond Dependency–A Tale of Two Strategies, Two Futures

Nokia’s Stephen Elop is getting some grief for his choice of Windows to fuel his company’s new SmartPhones. (see Grief and disbelief greet Elop’s Nokia revolution)  Over at HP, CEO Apotheker is dumping Microsoft in favor of its own OS (Global CIO: HP Mobile Dump Of Microsoft Is Brilliant). These are two strategic visions heading.

Read more

Watson and Jeopardy and Why I’m Only Marginally Impressed

Well, Watson beat human its human competitors on Jeopardy, but I think the challenge Ken Jennings gave to IBM today sums up the one-trick pony aspect of Watson: Let put it on Dancing with the Stars to see what it can really do. Watson, could not see, nor hear, and it could not write, let.

Read more

Economic Balance Can’t Come from Sovereign State Policy Makers

Today’s strategy+business article, A Continuous Quest for Economic Balance, discusses what countries must do to balance their economies. It starts, in its first sentence, revealing a bias by focusing on “what cracks the storm [the economic crisis] revealed in the foundations of national economies.” I think there is a larger crack that appeared during the.

Read more

More 2 Unlearn, Further thoughts on the paper: Retrieval Practice Produces More Learning than Elaborative Studying with Concept Mapping

I want to start with the conclusion of this paper by Karpicke and Blunt (Science, January 2011). Research on retrieval practice suggests a view of how the human mind works that differs from everyday intuitions. Retrieval is not merely a read out of the knowledge stored in one’s mind – the act of reconstructing knowledge.

Read more

What’s the Issue with Apple Magazine Subscriptions

As a consumer, I see nothing wrong with subscriptions coming through the Apple App Store, as was announced today (Apple Launches Subscriptions on the App Store). At least from the business model standpoint as we transition from paper to digital formats. Obtaining traditional magazines in digital format, however, is not the future of content. In.

Read more

Where Next for Nokia and Microsoft?–Be the Best Windows Phone Partner or Be Irrelevant

So Nokia has decided to partner with Microsoft. The details may have changed, but my strategic advice to them remains the same. They need to analyze their strengths against the competitors and combine those with the strengths of the Microsoft platform in order to out innovate Apple and Google. They will not survive if they.

Read more

New Social Media Targeted to Learners

Here is an article from The Chronicle of Higher Education that looks at new social media services aimed at learners. My sense is that we already have commercial sites that meet most needs. Do you think any of these services will take off? If so, which ones? Why? Read the article here: New Social Software.

Read more

Time to Rethink First Two Years of Higher Ed?

From NPR February 9, 2010 As enrollment rates in colleges have continued to increase, a new book questions whether the historic number of young people attending college will actually learn all that much once they get to campus. In Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses, two authors present a study that followed 2,300 students.

Read more