Category: Political

Uncertainty: Fifteen Questions for 2015

This slideshow explores the uncertainties facing the world in 2015 and suggests fifteen strategic questions every organization should be asking.

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Why Big Data is Ringing You Up at Dinner

Big data wants to know how you will vote in November (it also wanted to know how voters would lean in the Scottish national vote and other exercises in democracy around the world). Well, not big data exactly but other bigs: big business, big campaigns. But there is no data about the future. Events about the.

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Keystone Pipeline Debate Needs Scenarios

The Keystone Pipeline debate needs scenarios. In the 13 August issue of New Scientist (Surprise! Keystone XL will make climate change worse), Hal Hodson covers a new report on the Keystone pipeline that suggests it will result in lower fuel costs, and therefore encourage the use of fossil fuels, which will ultimately contribute to greenhouse.

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The NSA Spying Program Value Fits the Serendipity Economy Model

I was listening to Warren Olney’s To the Point on the radio today as they discussed the NSA spying program PRISM (listen here: NSA Spying Program Puts Secretive Court in the Spotlight). One of the questions fit into The Serendipity Economy framework.: How does the government determine the value of the program? No one could.

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What the President Should Do Next

The 2012 Presidential election is over. As with many great events, it leaves the world with some certainties resolved, and it highlights uncertainties that loom even larger. Changes to The Affordable Care Act First and foremost, the uncertainty of the election is over.  We know that President Obama has been re-elected, and with that, and.

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Activating Citizens: I won’t go dark on SOPA or PIPA

Activating Citizens: I won’t go dark on SOPA or PIPA Activating Citizens…A sit-in is a protest that uses physical space to assert, in a passive way, the right of a person, or persons, to be where they are and to interact, hopefully in a positive, constructive way, with the people they don’t agree with—usually a.

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Why is Uncertainty in so many of Today’s Headlines

I just completed a brief interview on uncertainty, and I don’t think my answer was as precise as it could be. So I thought I would write out the answer here. Hope is a fact but certainty is a myth. Through the construct of hope, people may believe that things are stable or certain, but.

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Education: Embracing the Messiness of the Future

This morning I read a post: A Teacher’s Take on Brill’s ‘Class Warfare’ which covers some the arguments for and against Brill’s analysis of education through the lens of educator, Patrick Welsch’s review of Brill’s book in The Washington Post (“Class Warfare: Inside the Fight to Fix America’s Schools” by Steven Brill). As with much.

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A Must Listen: Ravitch: Standardized Testing Undermines Teaching from NPR Fresh Air

This interview is a couple of weeks old, but it is one of the best discussions I have heard on the issues of American education. I encourage you to take time to listen, or read the highlights. My commentary: When you listen to the privatization advocates, they make sense. When you listen to testing reform.

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Economic Balance Can’t Come from Sovereign State Policy Makers

Today’s strategy+business article, A Continuous Quest for Economic Balance, discusses what countries must do to balance their economies. It starts, in its first sentence, revealing a bias by focusing on “what cracks the storm [the economic crisis] revealed in the foundations of national economies.” I think there is a larger crack that appeared during the.

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