Category: Innovation

Eliminating Your Company’s Fear of Change

It seems like this week is the week to argue with bloggers over at Harvard Business Review. May latest read was Cure Your Company’s Allergy to Change by Brad Power. I don’t think fear of change is a structural issue. It is a behavioral and philosophical issue. Let me just focus on the list at.

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How Innovation Is More Poetry Than Science now up at Fast Company

In a recent conversation with Phil McKinney, former HP Chief Innovation Officer and author of Beyond the Obvious: Killer Questions That Spark Game-Changing Innovation, we discussed innovation and theory. McKinney said that much of the literature about innovation comes from theorists, not practitioners. I responded that some of us assert practical innovation insights informed by.

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A Punch List for Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer

Define Yahoo’s Strategic Position I always tell my clients that their company, no matter how old, is a gangly teenager. If they aren’t they are an at-risk newborn or a calcified senior citizen, neither of those categories offer as much promise as the gangly teenager with a strong body and mind, seeking desperately for meaning.

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New Fast Company Blog Post: Redefining Diversity For The New Global Workforce

Our views of diversity in America are changing, but they aren’t keeping up with the global reality that now faces American companies. Traditionally, diversity-focused on the integration of people from racial, gender, physical ability, and religious perspectives inside of large corporations motivated by political or operational imperative, or social good. The idea was to create.

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Innovation in Education Requires Smart use of Resources, Including People’s Time

Education Innovation In Kevin Pashuk’s post Why Your School Needs a Sandbox, the CIO argues that creating a sandbox reinforced education innovation and creates a mechanism for executing experiments that people want to try, and that the academic administration thinks might be successful. The model is a good one. I think what is more important.

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Retro Thinking During A Difficult Kodak Moment

Way back in 2005, Bloomberg Businessweek ran a piece called “A Tense Kodak Moment.” “Low-margin digital sales aren’t picking up the slack of disappearing film profits, and debt is coming due,” the piece proclaimed. This provided some prescient perspective for Eastman Kodak’s (NYSE: EK) current struggles, which it now appears to be betting on printing.

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3 Reasons CIOs Need Scenario Planning

Scenario planning is the art and practice of imagining multiple futures to create a strategic context for planning and decision making. Pioneered by Royal Dutch Shell in the ’60s and ’70s, the technique is now widely used by businesses and governments as an important element of strategic planning. Functional departments increasingly employ scenario planning to.

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Must Listen: Reinventing Discovery: The New Era Of Networked Science

A must-listen interview from Seattle’s KUOW THE CONVERSATION. Reinventing Discovery delivers a highly recommended new way to see science. It hints about how the Serendipity Economy is becoming reality for scientists. Michael Nielsen is the author of “Reinventing Discovery: the Era of Networked Science.” http://www.kuow.org/program.php?id=25124

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Shakespeare in Theory – and Why Computer’s Aren’t As Interesting As They Used to Be

or Shakespeare isn’t Anonymous In light of the fun, interesting, and I think, utterly fictional Anonymous, I thought I would repost this item from my now defunct Future of Information Work blog. Be challenged, but enjoy. 4/7/2008 2:45:59 PM Shakespeare Wars I have finally finished Rosenbaum’s Shakespeare Wars. I love Shakespeare, but why include comments.

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Confronting the Pace of Change

Thinking out loud about the pace of change. For more serious insights on innovation click here.

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