Standardized Tests Need to be Right

Standardized Tests Need to be Right

If a teacher makes an error on a test, I certainty remember a bit of student crowd sourcing that took. Place. First perhaps, a tentative question, then some brave soul that just pointed out the flaw – usually followed by an apology, an elimination or correction of the offending test question, followed by lunch and kick ball. With our emphasis on standardized test, the educator is no longer in control, the publisher is. And the publisher has to be good. Very good. Because there are already trust issues. Over the last few weeks Pearson hasn’t fared well in the identification of errors on their tests, ranging from foreign language to mathematics.  Here are a couple of articles and posts the follow the revelations.

No publisher is going to be 100% correct, all of the time, but they do need to be 100% non-defensive and proactively corrective – this isn’t a PR issue, it is about the future lives of students. Perhaps its time to take some productivity out of assessment and make it a bit more human—so mistakes become a learning opportunity for everyone involved, not an event akin to a machine breaking down on a manufacturing line.

 

Ay, caramba! Foreign language versions of school exams riddled with errors

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/ay-caramba-foreign-language-versions-school-exams-riddled-errors-article-1.1074805#ixzz1v4o5FnY2

 

Pineapplegate continues, with 20 more errors, and finally an apologia from Pearson

Read more: http://nycpublicschoolparents.blogspot.com/2012/05/pineapplegate-continues-with-20-more.html

 

Pineapplegate: Exclusive Memo Detailing the “Hare and the Pineapple” Passage
Read more:
http://ideas.time.com/2012/05/04/pineapplegate-exclusive-memo-detailing-the-hare-and-the-pineapple-passage/#ixzz1v4s9UHLB

Daniel W. Rasmus

Daniel W. Rasmus, Founder and Principal Analyst of Serious Insights, is an internationally recognized speaker on the future of work and education. He is the author of several books, including Listening to the Future and Management by Design.

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