Review: Revive Old Posts

Review: Revive Old Posts

The WordPress plugin Revive Old Posts, by Revive.Social does exactly what it says it does. The plugin mines existing content and republishes it across social media platforms. With nearly 1,000 posts, this keeps the Serious Insights posts top-of-feed in the channels that matter.

The tool supports most social media channels, including:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn (personal and page)
  • Tumbler
  • Pinterst
  • Google +

General settings define the following:

  • The minimum interval between sharesItem
  • The minimum post age
  • The maximum post age
  • The number of posts
  • If a post should be shared more than once
  • The post type (page, media, post, or products)
  • The ability to share new post immediately (if a site doesn’t, for instance, use JetPack and its instant sharing features.
  • The enabling of share content variations (leveraging a set of social posts variations stored in the post).

The latest version of Revive Old Posts improves significantly upon earlier versions that required more technical acumen to configure.

Revive old posts

The plugin requires just a few clicks to authorize the selected social media accounts.

Current Revive Old Post Pricing

Personal

$75

Business

$149

Marketer

$299

Lifetime pricing is also available.

What we like

General parameters give way to configurations for each social media channel. The parameters include the type of content to share (title or content, or both), and the maximum number of characters in the post.

Additional text gets to the marketing heart of Revive Old Posts. Administrators may assign any text ahead of, or after, the content derived from the post. The content link can be hidden, but I’m not sure the value of not sending people to the source material.

Revive Old Social cup of coffee with social media logos

The automation draws from a site’s entire corpus of content. Taxonomy filtering offers inclusion or exclusion by category. For instance, I don’t republish posted categorized as news. Revive Old Posts can also use a blog’s categories to generate hashtags. The choice of an Image Post is also an option.

To track marketing engagement, Revive Old Posts offers campaign medium and campaign names, making its campaigns visible in Google Analytics.

I like that Revive Old Posts just keeps rifling through my content, offering it up to new readers regularly. It also makes me feel like I need to keep publishing more, especially when reposting at more frequent rates. Subscribers will need to determine the appropriate repost frequency for their content and their audience.

What could be improved

Revive Old Posts offers a wide array of features that can sometimes feel a bit overwhelming. I started with resending tweets with the free version, and upgraded to the $75 a year subscription to ensure images from my posts were included in the social media engagements.

It was several years before I turned the features on Facebook and LinkedIn—and I’m not sure how effective these are. Twitter seems primed for retweeting with its massive throughput and short attention span. The other services act more like archives, and reposting might be viewed as redundant, perhaps annoying. Yes, reposting may get more eyes on a particular post, but it will also make the feed appear overly earnest.

Like many purchased plugins, Revive Old Posts requires an activation code upon purchase to validate ownership and turn on features.

Revive Old Posts: Bottom Line

For those who publish a lot of content, Revive Old Posts helps keep that content active in social media streams. The plugin is not an inexpensive investment, but if the business point of a website derives from content and traffic, then it will likely help fuel that mission.

The best endorsement we can make is that we pay for this plugin.


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Daniel W. Rasmus

Daniel W. Rasmus, Founder and Principal Analyst of Serious Insights, is an internationally recognized speaker on the future of work and education. He is the author of several books, including Listening to the Future and Management by Design.

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